Best cheap midi keyboard of 2019 1

Best cheap midi keyboard of 2019

Are you looking for cheap midi keyboard ?. Here are our pick for cheap midi keyboard. You can quickly check the list below and scroll down for the detail list to read more detail about the product and reviews from other customers.

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midiplus, 32-Key Midi Controller, 32-Key (AKM320)

$41.99
$34.37  in stock
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Best cheap midi keyboard of 2019 2 Amazon.com
as of February 3, 2020 5:18 am

The AKM320 32 mini size master keyboard controller which includes pitch and modulation wheels, volume slider, octave buttons (up & down), transpose buttons (up & down) and sustain pedal input. It's powered via a single USB cable and works instantly with computer building Mac OS X or Windows XP...

User reviews

This keyboard is pretty cute. I formerly had the Akai MPX keyboard, which looks really cool and which has more features, but which I got rid of because its action was so poor. This much less expensive keyboard has better action.When I first plugged it in, the lights came on but it did nothing. I fiddled around with it for a long time, but nothing but lights. I kind of figured it was a BAD USB cable, so I tried another cable from my pile of cables, and immediately the keyboard sprang to life. With a good cable, it just works with Garage Band. Yay!So! Note to the retailer, wholesaler, and manufacturer: PROVIDE ONLY TESTED CABLES. I was about to send this back as a piece of junk, costing everyone a good deal of time and money. You can thank me for spending the time to correct your unacceptable problem.Therefore, one star, for supplying a bad USB cable that has a high chance of frustrating a very large number of customers.
The first thing you are sure to notice about this keyboard is the price. Let's compare this to its closest relative, M-Audio Keystation Mini 32. The ADM320 is almost one third the price! So, what is the catch? What is wrong with this? Nothing! This has heavy duty pitch and mod wheels, not just buttons, so you get better control of those features, and it also has backlit octave and most notably, transpose buttons. Many much more expensive keyboards don't have transpose buttons and it is very useful to have them. Both the octave and transpose buttons work in the usual way and if you press both up and down at the same time, they return to neutral(and the backlights go off). There is also a useful volume slider that works very smoothly(do I have to tell you to be sure to keep the slider all the way to the right, which is maximum volume? Well, for those new to this, do it. You only move it to the left, which is lower volume, for effect). The volume slider can also be assigned to other tasks, such as pan, if you use "midi learn" mode in your software. It also has an input for a sustain pedal, surprising on such a small keyboard. One big difference between this and the M-Audio is that this cannot be programmed for different velocity curves and so forth. But the velocity curve it comes with is just fine. The fit, finish, and overall quality are absolutely first class. It comes with a heavy duty six foot USB cable( USB A to USB type B) and an instruction booklet which is very basic since there isn't much you have to learn about this keyboard. But the instructions do a good job of explaining everything for beginners. Comparing the size of this to the M-Audio, the white keys are a half inch longer than the M-Audio. Aside from the keys being a bit longer, the feel is close to the M-Audio, which is rather springy(my preference is less springy). Yes, you really get your money's worth with this! I am extremely impressed with this, especially the price. There is no reason not to choose this if you want a mini midi keyboard with a 32 key range. It also comes in an attractive sturdy box to keep it in. Before I bought this, I found a great demonstration on Youtube. It isn't in English(it is in Portuguese) but he does a great job putting it through its paces and it is easy to understand, so you can see it functions just as I have described.
I must say, I was a bit skeptical to purchase this midi controller. With that being said, I am so glad that I purchased this one. It was a nice touch to my studio and it has more keys than most of this value. I use it with SONAR x3 Producer and my DAW system picked it up instantly, after first hook-up and driver installed. Plug and play. It was set up and ready to go within 5 minutes!I would recommend this to anyone who is on a budget for a home recording studio. I've been using it for a little over a month now and the features it has built in are amazing and very touch sensitive. Pitch bender, phase control, or build it and map it to control as you please! Very well thought out design and will fit on any workstation.Cannot wait to see what they come up with next! midiplus AKM320 midiplus MIDI Keyboard Controller

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Alesis V49 | 49 Key USB MIDI Keyboard Controller with 8 Backlit Pads, 4 Assignable Knobs and Buttons, Plus a Professional Software Suite with ProTools | First Included

$128.98  in stock
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Best cheap midi keyboard of 2019 2 Amazon.com
as of February 3, 2020 5:18 am

The Alesis V49 is a powerful, intuitive MIDI controller that lets you take command of your music software with a series of pads, knobs, and buttons. With 49 full size velocity sensitive keys and Octave Up/Down buttons, you can expand the keyboard to the full melodic range and play bass lines,...

User reviews

Apparently everyone complaining about velocities can't be bothered to Google the problem.http://www.noterepeat.com/products/alesis/keyboards/v-series/519-alesis-v-series-adjusting-the-velocity-curve-of-the-keys-using-the-v-series-editorGo there and follow the instructions. I recommend setting the velocity curve to #2. Updating the firmware (on Alesis' site) is a good idea, as well. I used this keyboard at practice for the first time yesterday and I love it. The action is a little stiff compared to what I'm used to, but that took all of about 20 seconds to get used to. For the price and functionality, you are going to have a hard time finding a better deal than this keyboard.I love the editor, too. Being able to change the pads from note to CC, change the pad behavior to momentary or latch, and change the CC & on/off velocities for the pads and buttons is absolutely fantastic. I wish all keyboards had such an easy way to reroute and rework the internal commands.Should Alesis have shipped this with velocity #4 as the default? No. Is it difficult to fix? Possibly: if you are blind, paralyzed from the neck down, or just straight up have no arms or legs. I am NOT an Alesis shill, I just think it's ridiculous that this keyboard is getting bashed by people who obviously don't know what they're talking about.
I read all the reviews and feel that some are fake/paid. I bought the 61 key version and here's what you need to know (read the cons before you buy) -PROS -* Keys are good, not great. They're better than the cheap ones likes on the M-Audio Keystation, but they have a weird amount of resistance. You have to get used to pressing harder than usual.* Overall build quality is very nice. Much nicer than most Alesis products.* The slim size of the keyboard overall is great for fitting into a workstation and accommodating a computer keyboard or laptop. It has full sized keys and I can still reach over it to use my laptop easily. This is the main reason I didn't go with Akai (and cost).CONS -* Dynamics on keys/pads out of the box is horrifyingly awful. After downloading their software and dialing in my preferred sensitivity, it still isn't great. You have 7 types of dynamic to choose from, only two of which actually make sense, and none of them nail it. The physical key resistance is just too much to get soft dynamics out of.* Pads - After dialing in a sensitivity on the pads, they're somewhat playable IF you use a two finger tap to hit each pad, like another reviewer states. Double triggering is going to happen semi-frequently regardless of how careful you are. While the pads physically feel good, the biggest flaw is that even if you have the same sensitivity set for each pad, the physical sensor for each pad isn't the same so you'll have to tap one pad harder than the other.Overall, I wouldn't pay the new price for this again. If youre limited by budget, find a used one for $110 or buy a used Akai.
 This keyboard has been excellent to me so far. Just like the other users have said, you will definitely want to update the firmware as soon as you begin using this keyboard and also make sure to change the velocity curve to your liking. It comes with a curve of 4 which is a wild looking pressure sensitivity. It has a use but for most people I'm sure it is not the desired setting.49 keys is plenty of workspace for me. I've played piano here and there all my life but am only now learning and teaching myself how to play. Anything less than 49 keys I felt wouldn't be a enough workspace so I chose this. The keys are stiffer than I imagined but you'll get used to it.All knobs turn easily and the pads feel great to the touch. Modulator turns with ease and the pitch wheel has good spring to it.I'm using this with the supplied Ableton Live 9 Lite software and I love it. Implementation was a breeze and fast. Though, you will have to get through the activation and account creating phase to get everything setup. And Xpand!2 is awesome! Just make sure you grab the code for it after you register your V49.Last thing. Make sure you have room for it! It's a fairly large keyboard and is 37" wide! Make sure you have the real estate for it.

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Akai Professional MPK Mini MKII – 25 Key USB MIDI Keyboard Controller With 8 Drum Pads, 8 Assignable Q-Link Knobs and Pro Software Suite Included

$119.00  in stock
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Best cheap midi keyboard of 2019 2 Amazon.com
as of February 3, 2020 5:18 am

Take control, wherever you go go mobile without losing control. Akai Professional MPK Mini MKII is an ultra-compact keyboard controller designed for the traveling musician and the desktop producer. With a cluster of production-centric in-demand hardware controls coupled with a slim-line...

User reviews

This item, while it looks beautiful and functions well for a time, is built with incredibly poor and flimsy design. The keys are not supported in any way, with 1mm thick plastic holding each key to the controller. This plastic does not rotate when pressed, instead, it flexes, constantly putting the thin plastic under extreme tension.In less than a year of use, a ridiculous amount of keys have snapped off. This is a common problem, and no amount of super glue has been able to keep them on with such pathetic design quality.I urge you to search up: "Akai MK2 Mini keys snapping off"Take a look at a couple threads on the official akai community boards and you'll see that this is a very common and inherent design problem.
When I read the reviews complaining of the driver installation process I was thinking "It can't be THAT bad"... Well it is, it is easily the most idiotic driver/software installation I've ever experienced. There's no actual software included, instead you have to go to Akaipro.com, register your product, then they'll give you a list of downloads. You would think that the first item in the list would be drivers, NOPE. You would think that there would be an item in the list labelled drivers, NOPE. The first item in the list is Air Hybrid, well what is it and what is it used for, you'll have no clue because there's no description for it, you do find out later that you will need to install it but it's not the first thing you need to install.Looking through the list there's a download called MPC Essentials. Figuring it might have the drivers in it I downloaded it and ran it, it's got drivers in it alright. 3 drivers, one named Renaissance Driver, one named Element Driver, and one named Studio Driver. What's the difference between them? Who knows. At this point you'll be asking what kind of monster created this abomination. Turns out that you need to install the last option in the list first, the MPC Essential software THEN go back and download the Air Hybrid software and install that. Why not just include a simple list that tells you what to install and in what order? Or better yet, why not just include big install that installs everything you NEED to operate the MPK mini?One more example of how crazy this all is, when you go to run the firmware update it tells you to hold down the PROG button the keyboard. Problem is, there isn't a PROG button the keyboard. You have PROG 1 through 4, PROG Select, and PROG Change. Which one is the PROG button? Apparently none of them because it didn't work for me.There is such an obvious disconnect between the hardware engineers at Akai and software engineers. The hardware is good, it's built well for a relatively inexpensive item. The software portion is like nothing I've ever experienced before. It will leave you frustrated and speechless I promise you. There are similar keyboards from other manufacturers that'll give you comparable results without the headaches. I recommend you check them out.
This is a great piece of equipment for a beginner musician, but there IS a learning curve, so please be aware of that when buying. What you are purchasing is a MIDI controller (Musical Instrument Digital Interface). Unlike a synthesizer, MIDI controllers do not produce sound without software. It's basically just a tool to control computer software. So after you've downloaded the software and plug it in, you will still not have any sound generated until you've set everything up properly and loaded sounds onto the pads. So I feel it is slightly inaccurate to call it a "plug-in and go", as some people do.Pros:- Its easy to use AFTER you have learned how to set up and use it.- Its fun.- A good way to get into digital music making.- Budget friendly.Cons:- The software setup is kind of intimidating but luckily there are easy-to-find tutorials to help you.- Akai itself doesn't seem to have much assistance in actually using the controller. Every useful tutorial I found was by someone else, not the company. It would be nice for them to take the time to make more tutorials. Unless I just didn't find them? Everything I found just had to do with setting up the software, nothing really about HOW to actually use it.-The software that is included is limited. You can't use the knobs with MPC Essentials, you need Ableton or something similar for that. Or rather, I should say, you can't use the knobs for effects in your track. I believe you can use it for other things but I still don't quite understand that part.I am still learning to use this but it has gotten significantly funner to use as I have learned more about it and found sounds I like.Just as a tip:- Make sure you know where all your files are saved when you setup the software. You will need to know where your VST stuff is so you can load it into MPC Essentials.-Use Program 2 when you're finally ready to start loading sounds in. Program 2 has the pads laid out in order in the software, so everything correlates properly.-Read the manual and do a lot of research if you are new to it. It's worth the time, trust me.

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Novation Launchkey Mini [MK3] 25-Mini-Key MIDI Keyboard

$109.97  in stock
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Best cheap midi keyboard of 2019 2 Amazon.com
as of February 3, 2020 5:18 am

Made to move. Launchkey mini is Novation most compact and portable 25-mini-key MIDI keyboard controller. It gives you everything you need to start creating in Ableton Live – and it’ll fit in your bag. Make tracks anywhere with launchkey Mini’s deep, intuitive Ableton control, arpeggiator, fixed...

User reviews

I own the mini MK2 and this is definitely quite the upgrade with tons of new features that make it great for producing, such as arpegio and the ability to change beat, rhythm, and pattern. They also have added pitch and modulation wheels and dedicated buttons for playing and recording. They also improved the sensitivity of the keys and the drum pads, so you no longer have to slam on it as hard as on the MK2.However, I use my Launchkeys for live looping and the way they changed some features makes it less than ideal for commonly used features while live looping. There are no longer dedicated buttons for features that the MK2 has. For example, in order to switch to "In Control" mode, you have to hold down the new "Shift" button while simultaneously pressing another button. Another example is the track buttons for switching through tracks left and right. In order to do this, you have to hold down the "Shift" button as well, but what makes matters worse is that the track buttons are on the other side of the keyboard from the "Shift" button. I like to do live loops during my performances, so I switch tracks quite often, but this is no longer feasible with the MK3 since I have to use both hands to switch tracks, which leaves me with no free hands to continue playing on the keys. I can see this becoming a common complaint for the MK3, so hopefully they release a firmware update that enables some sort of "Caps Lock" mode that keeps the "Shift" button enabled without having to hold it down.
I have been a musician for more than 15 years, playing the mandolin in acoustic jam sessions, bands and home recordings. I have also produced amateur recordings for about ten years, using several different hardware based digital multi-track recorders. In the last year I switched to computer based recording, when I discovered the affordability and astonishing breadth of capability offered by software systems. My choice of software is Logic Pro X and Mainstage 3. As I became familiar with the OSX music production software, I realized the importance of a midi controller to make use of the numerous software instruments and other digital music production techniques. I have nearly no keyboard skill, so this meant learning, not only a new musicianship skill, but also learning the technical nuts and bolts of digital music production methods. After several months of familiarizing myself with the capabilities of Logic and Mainstage I felt like I was ready to make a reasonably informed decision about what might be my best first midi hardware gear purchase. In this review I list the features I felt I would need to best enable my progress toward some minimal level of competence and how well I believe this controller met my expectations.First, I needed a keyboard that would not be a hindrance to learning to play a keyboard. I reasoned that I need full-sized keys, with velocity sensitivity, aftertouch, an adequate number octaves, a pitch bend wheel and a modulation wheel. Admitting that I do not have any experience against which to evaluate how this controller measures up against these criteria, I am very pleased with how this keyboard met my expectations. although not weighted, the key bed feels substantial and operates smoothly. Although far short of a full-sized 88-key behemoth, the Launchkey 49 seems completely adequate. The pitch and mod wheels are sturdy and responsive.To have some flexibility in mapping screen controls, in Mainstage and assigning them to physical midi controls, I predicted that I would need a reasonable number of knobs and sliders. While Launchkey controllers are specifically designed to map to the Abelton Live interface, I have found this controller to be sufficiently flexible for a variety of Mainstage patch configurations with enough physical controls to manage a number of instrument parameters, effects sends, patch changes etc.I anticipated that I would want several drum pads. I imagined using them, not so much for finger drumming, but for launching backing tracks, loops, drum sequences and one-shot clips. Short of buying a separate pad controller, Launchkey 49 offered enough pads to explore all these possibilities. The 16 drum pads are solid and responsive. They work beautifully for the functions I wanted them to serve in Mainstage. The pads have RGB back lighting, which have impressive plug and play functionality in Abelton, but I have not yet figured out if there is any way to use their RGB lights in Mainstage. At the very least, it would be helpful to be able to use the back lights to provide visual feedback on the pad or pads that are controlling an active clip or sequence.I have used the controller a little to control the free Abelton Lite software, bundled with the Launchkey 49. In this software environment this is an awesome controller.In summary, it seems that, as a beginning controller for a novice keyboardist and digital musician/producer, The Launchkey 49 provides a completely adequate keyboard and control surface for a very reasonable price. At this point I can say that I am very happy with this controller and anticipate that as I look to add gear to my rig I will likely not replace this controller, but keep it as part of an expanding rig.
Sync'd right up with my Presonus Studio One 3 Digital Audio Workstation (DAW). Plugged it into the USB port, went into the Presonus setup and changed the 'MIDI in' and 'MIDI out.' to 'Launchkey' No external software or drivers required, and best of all, no additional 'wall wart' power supply as it runs off of USB power. The keys feel like most any other keyboard controller in this price range. I do prefer weighted keys, but I wasn't willing to spend over $200 for yet another keyboard to add to my growing collection. For this price, you won't find a better deal.

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M Audio Keystation 49 MK3 | Compact Semi Weighted 49 Key MIDI Keyboard Controller with Assignable Controls, Pitch / Modulation Wheels and Software Production Suite included USB Powered

$99.00  in stock
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Best cheap midi keyboard of 2019 2 Amazon.com
as of February 3, 2020 5:18 am

Pure Player Experience Enter the world of unrestricted computer-based music creation and performance with the Keystation 49 MK3 keyboard controller from M-Audio - successor to the iconic Keystation 49 II. Keystation 49 MK3 is a full-featured, powerful MIDI keyboard controller engineered for...

User reviews

I really want to love this thing. It's a great size, it looks sleek, and feels good to play. But here's the thing: M-Audio advertises this item as Plug-N-Play, but it's not. If you're planning to plug this directly into your laptop prepare to pull your hair out. The lights on the item will turn on and your computer will recognize it as an available device but if you go to use it in Garageband, Logic Pro, etc, it will not actually control a software instrument.After sinking hours of my life into trying to figure this out, I finally stumbled across a forum that explained the issue. Apparently, the USB port in your computer does not feed the item enough power for it to function properly. Only if you plug it into a powered USB hub that you then plug into your computer will it work. I tried it in my USB hub and sure enough, it worked. This is extra stupid because I regularly use a Pearl malletSTATION (which is massive) and it's powered only by the USB port in my laptop. No extra power needed.M-Audio advertises this thing as "Ultra-Portable" but it clearly is not. Not if I have to carry around a powered USB hub for it to actually function. To say this is a design flaw is a massive understatement. Incredibly frustrating and absolutely asinine. Save your money and buy something that actually works.
TL;DR - TRY DIFFERENT CABLES! or USB hub!I was excited to use this controller, but to my dismay my Mac (High Sierra 10.13) with Logic Pro X was not receiving any signals from it. It was recognizing the device (in Logic Pro and Audio Midi setup), but none of the key presses were being received.After an hour of googling, some have seemed to solve the problem by using a USB 2 hub but I didn't want to go that route. So I decided to throw some extra cables I had at it to see if it would make any difference. I was surprised to find that it worked! I swapped the cables multiple times and the results are the same, the extra cable I had lying around has no issues, but the included one is clearly broken. Glad I tried this as I was about to return it.
I've played 40+years & have owned many synths, pianos etc & this keyboard has really nice action, feel. Simple layout, I don't need pads or a bunch of sliders so this is perfect for me. Very good keyboard action, somewhere between a synth & a weighted kybd, I love it! Feels pro! I tried the Nektar Impact GX61 Controller Keyboard & it feels like a toy. Prior to this I had the Axiom & that was pretty good, this is much better. & crazy cheap, great value for money. Please make one with 73 keys!

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